Winnipeg Wanderings

I have spent a bit of time in Winnipeg to explore and to celebrate Canada’s 150th Birthday. Interestingly the city is only about 10km off the longitudinal centre of North America so also marks my halfway point of the journey.

Winnipeg is the capital of Manitoba and is situated at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine River. The city is named after the nearby Winnipeg Lake which derives its name from the Western Cree language meaning Muddy Water which given the colour of the rivers running through the town is quite an apt description!

One last fact is that Winnipeg has the highest percent of First Nations people of any city in Canada at 11.7%, the city in general seems to be diverse with over 100 languages spoken.

I got to the city on the 27th June and spent the next two days going between bike shops to get the parts to carry out some much needed maintenance. I had designed the bike so that parts should be easy to come across but I hadn’t taken into account the fact 11 speed cassettes weren’t particularly popular in Canada for some reason! Once I had got all the bits and done the repairs it was time to start exploring properly.

DSC_0008.jpg

Winnipeg Legislative Building

On the 29th I walked down the trail next to the river and took a look at the Legislative Building before heading on. The next stop was The Forks which is particularly interesting, this is the point that the rivers join and a traditional meeting point for the First Nations, the area has some old stables that used to serve the river boats but is now a indoor market and restaurants. Pretty much all of the ground floor is food stores with the upper floor being mainly gifts and such. As I am sure you can imagine I spent some time on the ground floor…

DSC_0054.jpg

The Museum of Human Rights at the Forks

On the 30th I headed back to the Legislative Building which is supposed to be one of the most impressive in the country, and to be fair it was impressive! The building follows an ancient principle of incorporating the number 13. This may seem odd as its often seen as an unlucky number but in various different times it was given homage either to stave of bad luck or to invite good luck. Another curious feature (for all you acousticians and other geeks) is the Pool of the Black Star, a circular room underneath the dome that, when you stand in the centre, amplifies the sounds around you.

DSC_0032.jpg

Looking up from the Pool of the Black Star

After the Legislative building I headed over to St Boniface to have a nosey around the cathedral and university, while trying to get a shot I ended up chatting to another photographer who was going to do the photo’s for tomorrows festivities, as ever I got some info on where to go and local attractions.

DSC_0094.jpg

St Boniface façade

After St Boniface it was on to the remains of the old fort then back to the hostel to cook up some food.

1st of July… Canada Day.

A few of the peeps from the hostel and I spent most of the festivities at the forks where there were six stages of live music, a powwow, food stalls and a cheerfulness that only a few thousand friendly Canadians can exude.

20170701_163554.jpg

Main Stage at the Forks

I spent most of the day at main stage but couldn’t resist lunch at a pancake house, dinner of poutine and watched the powwow for a while. The night finished off with a fireworks show before I headed back for some much needed sleep.

20170701_231756

Big bangs

It should be noted that not everyone was celebrating, there was a demonstration by a group of First Nations people about the way they have been treated and the treaties that Canada has broken with them. One of the ladies at the hostel did a few interviews to try to understand what this. Check the video out at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JecB6Bm5iyc&feature=youtu.be

The 2nd July was at the hostel having a good old natter with some of the other residents and resting up.

 

Supported by 10401067_29999502286_5190_n

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s